Monthly Archives: February 2016

Music Review: Yoko Ono

By Spenser Webb, Entertainment Writer 

Yoko Ono (yes, that Yoko Ono) recently released a new compilation album entitled “Yes, I’m a Witch Too”. The album title is a double play on words, referring to her public image where many scorned Beatles fans refer to Yoko in less than kind terms, at times even as a witch, as well as a play on the word too (two) referring to her 2007 release “Yes, I’m a Witch”. The seventeen track album features Yoko singing on every track with guest artists composing the music. These artists include Death Cab for Cutie, Portugal. The Man, Miike Snow, Yoko’s son Sean Lennon, and thirteen other artists of varying degrees of fame.

Photo Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/10/arts/design/yoko-onos-1971-moma-show-finally-opens.html

Photo Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/10/arts/design/yoko-onos-1971-moma-show-finally-opens.html

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Movie Review: The Witch

By Nate Willis, Entertainment Writer 

In his directorial feature-length film debut, Robert Eggers (who previously worked as a writer, costume designer, and production designer on several short films) shows a great amount of potential in the slow-building horror genre with “The Witch”. Combined with the eerie score from Mark Korven, “The Witch” becomes an intense exploration into America’s dark past through a fictional lens. The acting was great all-around, especially from newcomers Anya Taylor-Joy and Harvey Scrimshaw, siblings who get caught-up in the cruel and unforgiving world of 1600s New England.  An interesting note about “The Witch”: most of the dialogue comes directly from real folk tales from that era.

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Faculty and Administration Work to Solve Tough Issues on Campus

By Steve Rusakiewicz, News Writer 

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Photo Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/missourisandt/4458331706

Whenever a complex organization is formed to provide valuable goods and/or services, the inevitability of internal conflict is one which must be preemptively addressed, lest the organization fall apart at the first disagreement between participating members.  Typically, such potential conflicts are addressed with a very specific set of guidelines often termed “Collective Rules and Regulations” (CRR), “Compliance Policies,” or another such related synonym.  The need for standardized conflict resolution procedures is obvious to anyone who has ever been involved in a personal dispute.  Scale up the complexities of a personal dispute to the level of a University, and the need becomes even more apparent.  Sometimes, however, when the stakes at the center of a dispute are high enough, and when both sides are comprised of highly-intelligent, extremely passionate people who invest themselves very personally in their work, the standard procedure for conflict resolution can give the appearance of exacerbating a situation even when it is being pursued in good faith and best intent.  The internal memo from the faculty senate officers to the Chancellor and Provost, provided anonymously to the Miner at the end of January, serves as an example of this phenomenon.

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Journalism in Communist Countries

By Leslie Hamilton, Features Writer

Currently, there are five remaining communist countries in the world – China, Cuba, Laos, North Korea, and Vietnam. Communist regimes are notorious for their oppression of personal freedoms such as freedom of speech and freedom of press, which is something that we, as Americans living in a democratic country founded upon such freedoms, don’t quite grasp. In a country like ours, we are so accustomed to scouring the internet for the truth and having to evaluate sources based on personal biases, credentials, etc.. In communist countries however, the basic concern is what are they not being told, or what has been skirted around by reporters or censored by government officials. In China, for example, journalism students have reported to US News and World Report, that they do not feel comfortable with expressing their own personal opinions and that if they do cover something, they try not to go too far since many journalists, while inspiring to students, are often jailed for their “crimes” against the Communist party/government. China is known for having imprisoned the most journalists in the world; however, Chinese journalism students report that journalism in their country is in a slow transitional period right now as the government is losing a grip on the media outlets, where journalists can now skirt around searched terms previously blocked by government censors or finely toeing the line between criticizing the Chinese government and committing a crime against the communist party. Now that there are more independent sources of funding (mainly advertisement) for Chinese publishers, the Chinese media has gained some freedom from the government censorship.

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BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU

By Emily Hibbits

In the 21st century, the most valuable asset that one can attain is information. In a society driven by the World Wide Web, the information available is limitless, including personal information. Everything searched on Google, Amazon, and Facebook is recorded and collected. Your personal data is stored and then used to personally market to your wants and needs. After online shopping, it is likely that your Facebook advertisements mirror the products that you recently viewed. This may all seem innocent, but when does it cross the line?

In an interview on National Public Radio with Audie Cornish and Manoush Zomorodi, a device called “Stingray” was discussed. Zomorodi states, “Stingray is a device that basically acts like a fake cell phone tower. It sends out a signal that talks to all the phones in the area, even if they’re not being used. And the technical term is an International Mobile Subscriber Identity Catcher. And so it can be used to listen in on a cell phone, but most importantly, Stingrays can track a cell phone and its owner right down to the room or even the pocket that it’s in.”

In the November 2015 issue of The Atlantic, Walter Kirn describes an instance which made him uneasy. He called to his wife in the next room to ask her where she put the walnuts – she didn’t hear him. A few minutes later he checked the fitness app on his phone and noticed a notification that popped up. “Walnuts,” it read, “It told me to eat more walnuts.” What’s the big deal? If you’re living a relatively normal life, you may have nothing to hide. In Kirn’s article entitled, “If You’re Not Paranoid, You’re Crazy”, he points out, “How could you anticipate the ways in which insights bred of spying might prove handy to some future regime? New tools have a way of breeding new abuses. Detailed logs of behaviors that I found tame – my Amazon purchases, online comments, and even my meanderings through the physical world, collected by biometric scanners, say, or license-plate readers on police cars – might someday be read in a hundred different ways by powers whose purposes I cannot fathom.”

Fox Mulder puts it frankly in a monologue on X-Files, “The corporate takeover of food and agriculture, pharmaceuticals and health care, even the military, in clandestine agendas, to fatten, dull, sicken and control a populace already consumed by consumerism…”

Last year there was evidence that Google Chrome could actively listen into your room by transmitting audio data from a black box of code, according to the New York Times. The user must approve an “Enable Microphone” notification (which pops up behind the browser). Marc Weber Tobias states, “The permission to turn on your microphone will remain active until cancelled, which means a site can continue to monitor your speech without your knowledge.”

Similarly, some iPhone apps request microphone and location data to be turned on. The location data can be compiled into a very detailed schedule. Cellphone towers and Wi-Fi hotspots update your location as you travel throughout the day. If you “Share your location” with friends, they can also track where you go. Apple has a “Next Destination” feature which studies your daily patterns and relays information back to you, such as, “It would take you about fifteen minutes to drive home right now.”

We are essentially the first generation to deal with this data overload. As technology becomes more sophisticated, so does the way in which people can be monitored. George Orwell’s 1984 paints the picture of a dystopian reality where “Big Brother is Watching You.” The novel’s protagonist, Winston, lives in a reality eerily similar to our own, “It was terribly dangerous to let your thoughts wander when you were in any public place or within range of a telescreen. The smallest thing could give you away. A nervous tic, an unconscious look of anxiety, a habit of muttering to yourself – anything that carried with it the suggestion of abnormality, of having something to hide.”

Kansas Beats Oklahoma, Takes First in the Big 12

By Tyler Zaring, Sports Writer

This past Saturday the Oklahoma Sooners and Kansas Jayhawks played for the second time this season. The winner of the game would take the lead in a tough Big 12 conference.

Oklahoma was coming off a loss to Kansas State last week, while Kansas has been playing well. These two teams met earlier in the year playing at Kansas. That game went into three overtimes where Kansas finally came out ahead to win by a score of 109-106. The game on Saturday was in Oklahoma where the Sooners looked to even the series on their home court.

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Return of the Schwartz: Blues beat Florida Panthers

By Nick Jacquin, Sports Writer 

It has been glaringly obvious that the St. Louis Blues have been missing an offensive spark for much of the season.  The return of Jaden Schwartz however, could prove to be the difference maker.  Schwartz, having been out the past 49 games with a broken ankle, returned on Friday night vs. the Florida Panthers, scoring one goal and adding an assist in the 5-3 Blues victory.

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Movie Review: Kung Fu Panda 3

By Nate Willis, Entertainment Writer 

In the third installment of the highly-successful “Kung Fu Panda” series, children and adults alike can expect a continuation of the mind-blowing animation styles, humor that is both kid-friendly and actually hilarious, and a cast of stars that few films can boast. While some college-aged people may roll their eyes at the mention of a kid-friendly animated film, I think the “Kung Fu Panda” series is genuinely unique. DreamWorks actually released two versions of this film: one in Mandarin, with Chinese voice actors, and one in English, with American voice actors.

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Photo Source: http://fullhdpictures.com/kung-fu-panda-3-hq-photos.html/kung-fu-panda-3-backgrounds

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Music Review: Milk Teeth

By Spenser Webb, Entertainment Writer 

UK punk artist Milk Teeth recently released their first full length studio album “Vile Child”. The twelve track album is the band’s first release since April 2015’s “Sad Sack” EP and Milk Teeth’s second release since signing with Hopeless Records.

Overall, Milk Teeth produces a very interesting sound. There’s a strong juxtaposition of musical themes even within single tracks. Milk Teeth seems to borrow heavily from the influence of the pixies and the grunge groups they inspired, producing an alternating loud-quiet feel. This dynamic isn’t limited to the music as Milk Teeth has two vocalists, Becky Blomfield who often produces a softer and enticing sound and a male vocalist Josh Bannister (who recently left the band) who produces a much more guttural and violent sound. With so much stylistic change not only from song to song but within each individual track as well, listening to Milk Teeth is anything but boring.

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